Cancer

There are over 200 different cancers. The risk of developing several of them is linked to how active you are. Most of us dread developing any kind of cancer so it’s helpful to know that you can reduce your risk by being more active. Being active can also improve your chance of recovery.

Professor Robert Thomas has produced a video on the importance of physical activity if you have cancer or are undergoing treatment. he also looks at how relatives and friends can help.

Colon cancer

If you are physically active you have a 30-40% lower risk of developing cancer of the colon. The higher intensity your exercise is the more effect it has.

Pre-treatment

Being active before you start your cancer treatment can be really helpful. Aerobic and resistance exercise and pelvic floor training can help in several ways, in particular in helping improve your cardiovascular fitness and mobility.

Getting more active when you find out you have cancer can help you survive it and it gives you the chance to take control and do something positive.

During treatment

Cancer treatments can leave you feeling pretty horrible and very tired (your doctor may call this fatigue, it’s not the same as being tired form normal everyday activity). Exercise might be the last thing on your mind if you are having cancer treatment but it does help. There are lots of mental health benefits of exercise and it can lift your mood so don’t be put off exercising, it will improve your quality of life. It will also help you improve your fitness and muscle strength.

Many people worry that because treatment makes them tired exercise will make the tiredness worse, but that isn’t the case. People mostly find that physical activity makes no difference to their levels of fatigue.

After treatment

After treatment you can feel rotten, anything you can do to help is a good thing and of course exercise does help. It not only helps you regain your strength and fitness but also can help with anxiety and depression. It really can improve your quality of life and it is something you can do to help yourself.

Survival

Don’t just take our word for it, research has shown that survivors of breast and colon cancer who increased their activity levels when they got their diagnosis improved their chance of survival by a staggering 39%.

What type of exercise is right

You should aim to do some aerobic activity (ie something that raises your heart rate and gets you warmer), some resistance training (ie something that builds up your strength) and something that helps with flexibility. Start small, if you haven’t done much exercise in the past start with a gentle walk each day, and over time increase how far you walk and how fast you walk. As your fitness improves you can try other activities.

It is best to talk to your doctor before starting any new exercise plan, you may be offered help with a specific program.

Aerobic exercise includes walking, Nordic walking, cycling, rowing, swimming and circuit classes. You could also try something like walking football.

Resistance exercise includes any activity that works your muscles – this includes carrying shopping bags and simple sitting to standing exercises. As you feel more confident you can try using weights, resistance machines, squats, wall presses or press ups. Yoga also helps build up your muscles, it helps with flexibility too.

Flexibility and balance are also important. Any exercise that improves mobility or involves stretching or balancing is good, especially if you have limited movement in a specific area of your body. Tai Chi, yoga, dance and even playing bowls are good examples.

There are lots of different types of exercise to try, the best advice is to find something that you enjoy, and try something different if you start to get bored. You could try a specialised program from a qualified Exercise on Referral professional.

Breast cancer

Women who are physically active have a 20-30% lower risk of breast cancer. Exercise is particularly important after the menopause.

NICE guidelines actually state that you should be given information to help you start an exercise program to help with tiredness, lymph swelling and to improve your quality of life.

Pre-treatment

Being active before you start your cancer treatment can be really helpful. Aerobic and resistance exercise can help in several ways, in particular in helping improve your cardiovascular fitness and mobility.

Getting more active when you find out you have cancer can help you survive it, and it gives you the chance to take control and do something positive.

During treatment

Cancer treatments can leave you feeling pretty horrible. Exercise might be the last thing on your mind if you are having cancer treatment but it does help. There are lots of mental health benefits of exercise and it can lift your mood so don’t be put off exercising, it will improve your quality of life. It will also help you improve your fitness and muscle strength.

Breast cancer patients will find being active helps restore arm movement, and despite what you might think there is no evidence that it makes swelling or oedema worse.

After treatment

After treatment you can feel rotten, anything you can do to help is a good thing and of course exercise does help. It not only helps you regain your strength and fitness but also can help with anxiety and depression. It really can improve your quality of life and it is something you can do to help yourself.

Survival

Don’t just take our word for it, research has shown that survivors of breast cancer who increased their activity levels when they got their diagnosis improved their chance of survival by a staggering 39%. That has to be worth doing don’t you think?

What type of exercise is right

You should aim to do some aerobic activity (ie something that raises your heart rate and gets you warmer), some resistance training (ie something that builds up your strength) and something that helps with flexibility. Start small, if you haven’t done much exercise in the past start with a gentle walk each day, and over time increase how far you walk and how fast you walk. As your fitness improves you can try other activities.

It is best to talk to your doctor before starting any new exercise plan, you may be offered help with a specific program.

Aerobic exercise includes walking, Nordic walking, cycling, rowing, swimming and circuit classes. You could also try something like walking football.

Resistance exercise includes any activity that works your muscles – this includes carrying shopping bags and simple sitting to standing exercises. As you feel more confident you can try using weights, resistance machines, squats, wall presses or press ups. Yoga also helps build up your muscles, it helps with flexibility too.

Flexibility and balance are also important. Any exercise that improves mobility or involves stretching or balancing is good, especially if you have limited movement in a specific area of your body. Tai Chi, yoga, dance and even playing bowls are good examples.

There are lots of different types of exercise to try, the best advice is to find something that you enjoy, and try something different if you start to get bored. You could try a specialised program from a qualified Exercise on Referral professional.

Endometrial cancer

There is some evidence to show that being active helps prevent cancer of the uterus.

Pre-treatment

Being active before you start your cancer treatment can be really helpful. Aerobic and resistance exercise can help in several ways, in particular in helping improve your cardiovascular fitness and mobility. Getting more active when you find out you have cancer can help you survive it and it gives you the chance to take control and do something positive.

During treatment

Cancer treatments can leave you feeling pretty horrible. Exercise might be the last thing on your mind if you are having cancer treatment but it does help. There are lots of mental health benefits of exercise and it can lift your mood so don’t be put off exercising, it will improve your quality of life. It will also help you improve your fitness and muscle strength.

After treatment

After treatment you can feel rotten, anything you can do to help is a good thing and of course exercise does help. It not only helps you regain your strength and fitness but also can help with anxiety and depression. It really can improve your quality of life, and it is something you can do to help yourself.

Survival

There are no specific studies relating to exercise and endometrial cancer survival but the figures are so amazing for breast and colon cancer it has to worth making the effort. Research has shown that survivors of breast and colon cancer who increased their activity levels when they got their diagnosis improved their chance of survival by a staggering 39%.

What type of exercise is right

You should aim to do some aerobic activity (ie something that raises your heart rate and gets you warmer), some resistance training (ie something that builds up your strength) and something that helps with flexibility. Start small, if you haven’t done much exercise in the past start with a gentle walk each day, and over time increase how far you walk and how fast you walk. As your fitness improves you can try other activities.

It is best to talk to your doctor before starting any new exercise plan, you may be offered help with a specific program.

Aerobic exercise includes walking, Nordic walking, cycling, rowing, swimming and circuit classes. You could also try something like walking football.

Resistance exercise includes any activity that works your muscles – this includes carrying shopping bags and simple sitting to standing exercises. As you feel more confident you can try using weights, resistance machines, squats, wall presses or press ups. Yoga also helps build up your muscles, it helps with flexibility too.

Flexibility and balance are also important. Any exercise that improves mobility or involves stretching or balancing is good, especially if you have limited movement in a specific area of your body. Tai Chi, yoga, dance and even playing bowls are good examples.

There are lots of different types of exercise to try, the best advice is to find something that you enjoy, and try something different if you start to get bored. You could try a specialised program from a qualified Exercise on Referral professional.

Prostate cancer

Being active can help prevent prostate cancer but you need to be quite active. 30 minutes of walking or cycling per day reduces your risk, every additional 30 minutes per day reduces it by 7%. The more you do the better.

Pre-treatment

Being active before you start your cancer treatment can be really helpful. Aerobic and resistance exercise and pelvic floor training can help in several ways, in particular in helping improve your cardiovascular fitness and mobility. Incontinence can be a problem for people suffering from prostate cancer, pelvic floor exercises can be really helpful.

Getting more active when you find out you have cancer can help you survive it and it gives you the chance to take control and do something positive.

During treatment

Cancer treatments can leave you feeling pretty horrible. Exercise might be the last thing on your mind if you are having cancer treatment but it does help. There are lots of mental health benefits of exercise and it can lift your mood so don’t be put off exercising, it will improve your quality of life. It will also help you improve your fitness and muscle strength.

After treatment

After treatment you can feel rotten, anything you can do to help is a good thing and of course exercise does help. It not only helps you regain your strength and fitness but also can help with anxiety and depression. It really can improve your quality of life and it is something you can do to help yourself.

Survival

There are no specific studies relating to exercise and prostate cancer survival but the figures are so amazing for breast and colon cancer it has to worth making the effort. Research has shown that survivors of breast and colon cancer who increased their activity levels when they got their diagnosis improved their chance of survival by a staggering 39%.

What type of exercise is right

You should aim to do some aerobic activity (ie something that raises your heart rate and gets you warmer), some resistance training (ie something that builds up your strength) and something that helps with flexibility. Start small, if you haven’t done much exercise in the past start with a gentle walk each day, and over time increase how far you walk and how fast you walk. As your fitness improves you can try other activities.

It is best to talk to your doctor before starting any new exercise plan, you may be offered help with a specific program.

Aerobic exercise includes walking, Nordic walking, cycling, rowing, swimming and circuit classes. You could also try something like walking football.

Resistance exercise includes any activity that works your muscles – this includes carrying shopping bags and simple sitting to standing exercises. As you feel more confident you can try using weights, resistance machines, squats, wall presses or press ups. Yoga also helps build up your muscles, it helps with flexibility too.

Flexibility and balance are also important. Any exercise that improves mobility or involves stretching or balancing is good, especially if you have limited movement in a specific area of your body. Tai Chi, yoga, dance and even playing bowls are good examples.

There are lots of different types of exercise to try, the best advice is to find something that you enjoy, and try something different if you start to get bored. You could try a specialised program from a qualified Exercise on Referral professional.

Gastric cancer

There is emerging evidence that active people reduce their risk of developing gastric cancer by 13-28%.

Pre-treatment

Being active before you start your cancer treatment can be really helpful. Aerobic and resistance exercise can help in several ways, in particular in helping improve your cardiovascular fitness and mobility.

Getting more active when you find out you have cancer can help you survive it and it gives you the chance to take control and do something positive.

During treatment

Cancer treatments can leave you feeling pretty horrible. Exercise might be the last thing on your mind if you are having cancer treatment, but it does help. There are lots of mental health benefits of exercise and it can lift your mood so don’t be put off exercising, it will improve your quality of life. It will also help you improve your fitness and muscle strength.

After treatment

After treatment you can feel rotten, anything you can do to help is a good thing and of course exercise does help. It not only helps you regain your strength and fitness but also can help with anxiety and depression. It really can improve your quality of life and it is something you can do to help yourself.

Survival

There are no specific studies relating to exercise and gastric cancer survival but the figures are so amazing for breast and colon cancer it has to worth making the effort. Research has shown that survivors of breast and colon cancer who increased their activity levels when they got their diagnosis improved their chance of survival by a staggering 39%.

What type of exercise is right

You should aim to do some aerobic activity (ie something that raises your heart rate and gets you warmer), some resistance training (ie something that builds up your strength) and something that helps with flexibility. Start small, if you haven’t done much exercise in the past start with a gentle walk each day, and over time increase how far you walk and how fast you walk. As your fitness improves you can try other activities.

It is best to talk to your doctor before starting any new exercise plan, you may be offered help with a specific program.

Aerobic exercise includes walking, Nordic walking, cycling, rowing, swimming and circuit classes. You could also try something like walking football.

Resistance exercise includes any activity that works your muscles – this includes carrying shopping bags and simple sitting to standing exercises. As you feel more confident you can try using weights, resistance machines, squats, wall presses or press ups. Yoga also helps build up your muscles, it helps with flexibility too.

Flexibility and balance are also important. Any exercise that improves mobility or involves stretching or balancing is good, especially if you have limited movement in a specific area of your body. Tai Chi, yoga, dance and even playing bowls are good examples.

There are lots of different types of exercise to try, the best advice is to find something that you enjoy, and try something different if you start to get bored. You could try a specialised program from a qualified Exercise on Referral professional.

Lung cancer

There is some evidence to suggest that active people have a reduced risk of developing lung cancer but the risk from smoking is so high it tends to override other factors.

Pre-treatment

Being active before you start your cancer treatment can be really helpful. Aerobic and resistance exercise can help in several ways, in particular in helping improve your cardiovascular fitness and mobility.

Getting more active when you find out you have cancer can help you survive it and it gives you the chance to take control and do something positive.

During treatment

Cancer treatments can leave you feeling pretty horrible. Exercise might be the last thing on your mind if you are having cancer treatment but it does help. There are lots of mental health benefits of exercise and it can lift your mood so don’t be put off exercising, it will improve your quality of life. It will also help you improve your fitness and muscle strength.

After treatment

After treatment you can feel rotten, anything you can do to help is a good thing and of course exercise does help. It not only helps you regain your strength and fitness but also can help with anxiety and depression. It really can improve your quality of life and it is something you can do to help yourself.

Survival

There are no specific studies relating to exercise and lung cancer survival but the figures are so amazing for breast and colon cancer it has to worth making the effort. Research has shown that survivors of breast and colon cancer who increased their activity levels when they got their diagnosis improved their chance of survival by a staggering 39%.

What type of exercise is right

Aerobic exercise is particularly beneficial if you have lung cancer. You should aim to combine this with some resistance training (ie something that builds up your strength) and something that helps with flexibility. Start small, if you haven’t done much exercise in the past start with a gentle walk each day, and over time increase how far and how fast you walk. As your fitness improves you can try other activities.

It is best to talk to your doctor before starting any new exercise plan, you may be offered help with a specific program.

Aerobic exercise is anything that that raises your heart rate and gets you warmer. It includes walking, Nordic walking, cycling, rowing, swimming and circuit classes. You could also try something like walking football.

Resistance exercise includes any activity that works your muscles – this includes carrying shopping bags and simple sitting to standing exercises. As you feel more confident you can try using weights, resistance machines, squats, wall presses or press ups. Yoga also helps build up your muscles, it helps with flexibility too.

Flexibility and balance are also important. Any exercise that improves mobility or involves stretching or balancing is good, especially if you have limited movement in a specific area of your body. Tai Chi, yoga, dance and even playing bowls are good examples.

There are lots of different types of exercise to try, the best advice is to find something that you enjoy, and try something different if you start to get bored. You could try a specialised program from a qualified Exercise on Referral professional.

Oesophageal cancer

There is emerging evidence that active people are 20-30% less likely to get oesophageal cancer.

Pre-treatment

Being active before you start your cancer treatment can be really helpful. Aerobic and resistance exercise and pelvic floor training can help in several ways, in particular in helping improve your cardiovascular fitness and mobility.

Getting more active when you find out you have cancer can help you survive it and it gives you the chance to take control and do something positive.

During treatment

Cancer treatments can leave you feeling pretty horrible. Exercise might be the last thing on your mind if you are having cancer treatment but it does help. There are lots of mental health benefits of exercise and it can lift your mood so don’t be put off exercising, it will improve your quality of life. It will also help you improve your fitness and muscle strength.

After treatment

After treatment you can feel rotten, anything you can do to help is a good thing and of course exercise does help. It not only helps you regain your strength and fitness but also can help with anxiety and depression. It really can improve your quality of life and it is something you can do to help yourself.

Survival

There are no specific studies relating to exercise and oesophageal cancer survival but the figures are so amazing for breast and colon cancer it has to worth making the effort. Research has shown that survivors of breast and colon cancer who increased their activity levels when they got their diagnosis improved their chance of survival by a staggering 39%.

What type of exercise is right

You should aim to do some aerobic activity (ie something that raises your heart rate and gets you warmer), some resistance training (ie something that builds up your strength) and something that helps with flexibility. Start small, if you haven’t done much exercise in the past start with a gentle walk each day, and over time increase how far you walk and how fast you walk. As your fitness improves you can try other activities.

It is best to talk to your doctor before starting any new exercise plan, you may be offered help with a specific program.

Aerobic exercise includes walking, Nordic walking, cycling, rowing, swimming and circuit classes. You could also try something like walking football.

Resistance exercise includes any activity that works your muscles – this includes carrying shopping bags and simple sitting to standing exercises. As you feel more confident you can try using weights, resistance machines, squats, wall presses or press ups. Yoga also helps build up your muscles, it helps with flexibility too.

Flexibility and balance are also important. Any exercise that improves mobility or involves stretching or balancing is good, especially if you have limited movement in a specific area of your body. Tai Chi, yoga, dance and even playing bowls are good examples.

There are lots of different types of exercise to try, the best advice is to find something that you enjoy, and try something different if you start to get bored. You could try a specialised program from a qualified Exercise on Referral professional.