Get more active

Ideas on getting more active
There are lots of ways to build activity into your everyday life. We are advised to aim for around 30 minutes of activity at least 5 times per week. That can seem a lot, but you can break it down. It doesn’t have to be sport or dedicated exercise classes. Many jobs around the house involve activity and can help get you going.

  • Cleaning and polishing furniture, floors and windows.
  • Cutting the grass or the hedge.
  • Brushing the yard or raking up leaves.
  • Washing and polishing the car by hand.
  • DIY – carpentry, sanding, painting, building etc.

There are lots of ways you can add small amounts of walking into your daily routine too:

    • Leave the car at home for short journeys, eg. walk to the post box.
    • Walk the children or grandchildren to school, you’ll all benefit.
    • Park the car at the far side of the car park, you might find it’s quicker than driving around looking for a space near the shops anyway.
    • Get off the bus a stop early and walk the rest of the way.
    • Avoid lifts, use the stairs.

There are many other activities but most important is finding a form of exercise that you enjoy. You can try:

      • Walking – walk with a friend or join a walking group.
      • Cycling – there are lots of cycle paths across the UK and it is a fun activity for all the family.
      • Dance – increasingly popular, enjoyable and social with many alternative types such as salsa, zumba, line dancing and ballroom.
      • Swimming – traditional fun for the family.
      • Golf – 18 holes is five miles on most courses.
      • Tennis, squash, badminton – there are many clubs and courts all around the country for fun and competition.
      • Football – the nation’s most popular sport, so get out with your children and kick a ball again!
      • Yoga, Pilates and Tai Chi – excellent activities for flexibility, core strength and posture to relieve and prevent many back problems.

Monitoring
Some people find it helpful to keep a record of what they have done and use this to motivate themselves. There are lots of ways you can do this:

  • Keep an exercise diary – it’s a cheap and easy way to record your progress, success, feelings and maybe to help you identify your barriers to exercising.
  • Pedometers (a small portable device that counts each step you take) – are cheap and easy to use.
  • Some smart phones can be used to record your activity. There are also an increasing number of tracker bracelets that communicate with your phone or PC.
  • Walk4life – the walking website uses Ordnance Survey maps. You can search for walks, draw and save your own walks and use the ‘track your progress’ page to monitor your fitness.

I can do it

Get more active

Ideas on getting more active
There are lots of ways to build activity into your everyday life. We are advised to aim for around 30 minutes of activity at least 5 times per week. That can seem a lot, but you can break it down. It doesn’t have to be sport or dedicated exercise classes. Many jobs around the house involve activity and can help get you going.

  • Cleaning and polishing furniture, floors and windows.
  • Cutting the grass or the hedge.
  • Brushing the yard or raking up leaves.
  • Washing and polishing the car by hand.
  • DIY – carpentry, sanding, painting, building etc.

There are lots of ways you can add small amounts of walking into your daily routine too:

    • Leave the car at home for short journeys, eg. walk to the post box.
    • Walk the children or grandchildren to school, you’ll all benefit.
    • Park the car at the far side of the car park, you might find it’s quicker than driving around looking for a space near the shops anyway.
    • Get off the bus a stop early and walk the rest of the way.
    • Avoid lifts, use the stairs.

There are many other activities but most important is finding a form of exercise that you enjoy. You can try:

      • Walking – walk with a friend or join a walking group.
      • Cycling – there are lots of cycle paths across the UK and it is a fun activity for all the family.
      • Dance – increasingly popular, enjoyable and social with many alternative types such as salsa, zumba, line dancing and ballroom.
      • Swimming – traditional fun for the family.
      • Golf – 18 holes is five miles on most courses.
      • Tennis, squash, badminton – there are many clubs and courts all around the country for fun and competition.
      • Football – the nation’s most popular sport, so get out with your children and kick a ball again!
      • Yoga, Pilates and Tai Chi – excellent activities for flexibility, core strength and posture to relieve and prevent many back problems.

Monitoring
Some people find it helpful to keep a record of what they have done and use this to motivate themselves. There are lots of ways you can do this:

  • Keep an exercise diary – it’s a cheap and easy way to record your progress, success, feelings and maybe to help you identify your barriers to exercising.
  • Pedometers (a small portable device that counts each step you take) – are cheap and easy to use.
  • Some smart phones can be used to record your activity. There are also an increasing number of tracker bracelets that communicate with your phone or PC.
  • Walk4life – the walking website uses Ordnance Survey maps. You can search for walks, draw and save your own walks and use the ‘track your progress’ page to monitor your fitness.

I can do it